To see how smoking affects the body, click on the body parts.


Health Effects of Smoking

Cigarettes and Cancer

Cigarettes and Poison

Artery Damage

Eye Damage

Lung Damage

Mouth Damage

P53 Gene and Cancer

Smoking and Tar

Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death and disease in Australia. In 2003, it was estimated that tobacco use was responsible for more than 15,500 deaths. 1

Tobacco use not only reduces your life expectancy but your quality of life as well. Many medical conditions caused by smoking can result not just in death, but in living for years with disabling health problems. It is estimated that more than 204,700 years of healthy life were lost in Australia, in 2003, as a result of smoking.1

Inhaling the substances in any type of burning tobacco is harmful to the human body. The toxins in tobacco smoke can travel anywhere in the body that the blood flows2 causing harm to nearly every organ and system of the body. Low tar and low nicotine cigarettes are not safer to smoke and are not a healthier option compared to cigarettes with higher levels of these toxins.3,4

While some health effects from smoking are immediate there is a long time lag, sometimes decades, between smoking and many tobacco-related diseases. This time lag can result in some smokers believing it won’t happen to them; however, half of all lifetime smokers will die from smoking related diseases, and half of these will be in middle age (35-69yrs).5

Scientific evidence confirms that smokers face significantly increased risks of death and or illness from numerous cancers, heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, emphysema and other respiratory diseases. Smoking also causes blindness, dental problems, erectile dysfunction, reduced fertility in women, has been linked to sudden infant death syndrome, contributes to osteoporosis and increases the risks of pregnancy complications including premature birth, low birth weight, still birth and infant mortality. 2

Exposure to second-hand smoke also causes premature death and disease in children and adults who do not smoke. There is no risk-free level of exposure to second-hand smoke.6

Quitting at any age has health benefits, with the largest reduction in health risks in those who quit the earliest7. Many Australians remain unaware of the extent of the impact smoking has on the body. Thinking about quitting?

Sources:
  1. Begg S, Vos T, Barker B, Stevenson C, Stanley L, Lopez AD, 2007. The burden of disease and injury in Australia 2003. PHE 82. Canberra AIHW. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare-The burden of disease and injury in Australia 2003
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2004. The health consequences of smoking: a report of the Surgeon General. [Atlanta, Ga.]: Dept. of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; Washington, D.C. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  3. Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Media release 19 December 2005 Low yield cigarettes ‘not a healthier option’:$9 million campaign. Downloaded 16/10/07 from ACCC Media release 19 December 2005 Low yield cigarettes ‘not a healthier option
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2004. The health consequences of smoking: a report of the Surgeon General, What it means to you. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.
  5. Mackay J. and Erikson M. 2002. The Tobacco Atlas. World Health Organization. Geneva. Switzerland.
  6. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2006. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. [Atlanta, Ga.]. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Washington, D.C
  7. Doll R, Peto R, Boreham J, Sutherland I. Mortality in relation to smoking: 50 years observation on male British doctors. British Medical Journal. June 2004, 328:1519. BMJ - Mortality in relation to smoking